Summary
Pilot
Ongoing Project
Publications
SDGS
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

Making Voices Heard and Count in India

 

The Leave No One Behind coalition in India is headed by the national campaign Wada Na Todo Abhiyan, a platform that brings together 4.000+ civil society organisations across India.

Current members (October 2020) are:

Amnesty International India
Centre for Social Equity and Inclusion – CSEI
Human Rights Advocacy and Research Foundation – HRF
Islamic Relief Worldwide
Life Education and Development Society – LEADS
Oxfam India
Save the Children India
Sightsavers India
Wada Na Todo Abhiyan – WNTA (Lead)
World Vision India
Youth United for Voluntary Action – YUVA

The country coalition has delivered a project pilot between 2018 and 2019, focussing on 20 social groups including: scheduled and vulnerable caste and tribe communities; nomadic tribes; vulnerable children, young people and elderly; transgender people; bonded labourers; urban poor; fisherfolk; people with disabilities; religious minorities and vulnerable women. Target SDGs were SDG 1-8, 10, 11  and 16.

The scaled up project will be conducted between 2020 and 2022, with a cross-SDG focus and special emphasis on SDGs 5, 10 and 16. Goal is to empower local civil society and socially excluded vulnerable (SEV) communities to achieve critical SDGs through evidence-based advocacy. The project will reach about 3000 people across 6 states (additional funding needed to increase scale).

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

India Pilot

SDGs

  • Goal 1 (end poverty);
  • Goal 2 (zero hunger);
  • Goal 3 (good health and wellbeing);
  • Goal 4 (quality education);
  • Goal 5 (gender equality);
  • Goal 6 (clean water and sanitation);
  • Goal 7 (affordable and clean energy);
  • Goal 8 (decent work and economic growth);
  • Goal 10 (inequality);
  • Goal 11 (sustainable cities and communities);
  • Goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions)

Target groups

    20 social groups including: scheduled and vulnerable caste and tribe communities; nomadic tribes; vulnerable children, young people and elderly; transgender people; bonded labourers; urban poor; fisherfolk; people with disabilities; religious minorities and vulnerable women.

How did we engage marginalised groups in SDG monitoring?

    LNOB partners trained members of grassroots organisations representing marginalised groups in 10 ‘hotspots’. Representatives convened focus group discussions, key informant interviews and household surveys using a mobile app, reaching 1,000 people.

Ways target groups are left behind

    Of the 10 marginalised communities surveyed, all face discrimination in accessing key welfare schemes which are crucial to achieving the SDGs in India.
  • Girls and women additionally face gross inequalities and exclusion.
  • Child marriage and sexual abuse is widely prevalent in the communities sampled.
  • Groups in focus suffer from a high degree of unemployment: on average, they were employed for only 14 days a month. This situation is characterised by irregular earnings and wages.
  • Around 42% of the households do not have access to adequate housing and live in Kutcha houses, made of materials such as bamboo, mud, grass, unburnt bricks, etc., mainly in slums.

What is missed in national reporting?

  • The current national data systems like the Census and National Family Health Survey are based on averages of broad classifications of communities. These data do not reflect the situation of the most marginalised groups on different development indicators.
  • Government surveys are done at long intervals and thus not adequate for timely proactive policy interventions.
  • The comparison between primary data collected from the LNOB households and secondary data available through government sources clearly shows the gap between the target groups and national average on most of the development indicators.

National advocacy impact so far

    The India national coalition has engaged with the NITI Aayog, the body of the union government responsible for designing, coordinating facilitating and reporting on the SDGs. Some coalition members support various state governments in translating the SDGs related to their ministries and departments, and some already contribute to the annual monitoring report on specific SDG goals.

Recommendations

  • Collect and use disaggregated data on left-behind groups to frame policies, provisions and government planning.
  • Promote in-depth research on left behind groups within socially excluded communities to capture current development gaps, multiple barriers and constraints in accessing development provisions and rights.
  • Legislate the ‘anti-discrimination’ bill and orient duty bearers on the consequences of discrimination – build perspectives and skills to ensure social inclusion.
  • Build capacities and resources of the local governments to identify socially excluded sub-population groups within their jurisdiction, and develop strategies to promote social equity and inclusion through policies and provisions.
  • Implement effectively targeted affirmative action and entitlement programs aligned with SDG indicators for socially excluded groups.
  • Ensure strict implementation of legislation and mechanisms to prevent violence, protect life, livelihood and property, and ensure access to timely redress and justice.
  • Include a dedicated space for Leaving No One Behind in the Agenda 2030 plans of NITI Aayog and state plans; and establish a dedicated team for Leaving No One Behind in the SDG unit of NITI Aayog and corresponding officers in states.
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

India Ongoing Project

The 100 Hotspots: SEV communities advocate for achieving SDGs in India

Executive summary:

The project aims to empower CSOs/CLOs/CBOs and socially excluded vulnerable (SEV) communities to achieve critical SDGs through evidence-based advocacy. Further to the community led data generation process on SDGs for 35 SEV communities under the “100 Hotspots: Snapshot of socially excluded vulnerable communities and SDGs in India” during 2018-19; WNTA will identify six critical communities (hotspots) comprising 600 households – to map their recommendations for SDGs achievement in the ‘decade of action to deliver the goals’. This will be followed by capacity building of the CSOs and community champions to take up advocacy at local sub-national and national levels.

Project duration Grant period: 01/09/2020 – 30/04/2021

Project period: 01/08/2020 – 31/07/2022

Desired goals and outcomes
  • Empower CSOs/CLOs/CBOs and socially excluded vulnerable (SEV) communities to achieve critical SDGs through evidence-based advocacy
  • 6 Policy Briefs (collation of data and community consultations)
  • 1 Training module (secondary research and expert opinion)
  • SDG 16 indicators from SEV communities (consultations with community and experts; to be shared with MOSPI and UN in India)
Research focus topic(s) Justice, gender, inequality
SDGs/indicators covered All SDGs with special focus on SDGs 5, 16 and 10
Data generation methodology(s)
  • Primary data from 6 hotspots and secondary data around the 6 hotspots collated and analysed
  • Community and expert conversation to map critical advocacy areas and to develop SDG 16 – community specific indicators
Marginalised groups targeted 6 SEV communities (Single Women, Pahari Korwa, Sex Workers, Chudihara Muslim, Sahariya, Youth affected by gender-violence)
Research locations 6 SEC communities across 6 states (Chhattisgarh, West Bengal, Himachal Pradesh, Maharashtra, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh)
Total number of people reached About 3000 people from 600 households across 6 SEV communities (ca. 500 people across 100 households in each of the 6 locations)
Number of trainings / capacity building workshops In total 18 sessions, including indicators for SDG 16 (6 community conversations to build policy briefs and 12 sessions on capacity building on policy advocacy)
Number of dialogues with local authorities / decision makers 12 dialogues with local elected governments and district administrations by 6 SEV communities across 6 locations:

  • Policy recommendations for local government are meant to support the LNOB group to present their case with evidence before the local governments and influence them in their favour
Number of dialogues with national authorities 10 dialogues – sharing community recommendations with concerned elected members of parliaments, NITI Aayog, UN in India and other government bodies:

  • Indian LNOB coalition has a fair level of engagement with NITI Aayog and MOSPI, two important bodies for tracking SDGs, with MOSPI expressing interest to collaborate to develop indicators for SDG 16
Number of policy / service recommendations to be produced 6 – one for each SEV community
Targeted government institutions Local elected governments, local district administration (responsible for planning and implementation), national elected members of parliaments, MOSPI (Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation), and other related government bodies
Lead implementer WNTA (Wada Na Todo Abhiyan)
Other involved partner organisations
  • CSEI (Centre for social Equity and Inclusion)
  • HRF (Human Rights Advocacy and Research Foundation)
  • Oxfam India
  • Save the Children India
  • World Vision India

The ongoing project in India is supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung.

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

India Publications

Invisible and Uncounted (Story)

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Summary - India Pilot (Report)

This document outlines the findings from the India LNOB coalition's work during the pilot phase 2018 - 2019

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Our Target SDGS in India

Click on the SDG to reveal more information

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Extreme poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 1990. While this is a remarkable achievement, one in five people in developing regions still live on less than $1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount, plus many people risk slipping back into poverty.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making. Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centred rural development and protecting the environment.

Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods. Many rural women and men can no longer make ends meet on their land, forcing them to migrate to cities in search of opportunities.

A profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish today’s 815 million hungry and the additional 2 billion people expected by 2050.

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being for all at all ages is essential to sustainable development. Significant strides have been made in increasing life expectancy and reducing some of the common killers associated with child and maternal mortality. Major progress has been made on increasing access to clean water and sanitation, reducing malaria, tuberculosis, polio and the spread of HIV/AIDS. However, many more efforts are needed to fully eradicate a wide range of diseases and address many different persistent and emerging health issues.

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to improving people’s lives and sustainable development. Major progress has been made towards increasing access to education at all levels and increasing enrolment rates in schools particularly for women and girls. Basic literacy skills have improved tremendously, yet bolder efforts are needed to make even greater strides for achieving universal education goals. For example, the world has achieved equality in primary education between girls and boys, but few countries have achieved that target at all levels of education.

5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

While the world has achieved progress towards gender equality and women’s empowerment under the Millennium Development Goals (including equal access to primary education between girls and boys), women and girls continue to suffer discrimination and violence in every part of the world.

Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world.

Providing women and girls with equal access to education, health care, decent work, and representation in political and economic decision-making processes will fuel sustainable economies and benefit societies and humanity at large.

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. Drought afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition.

By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity the world faces today. Be it for jobs, security, climate change, food production or increasing incomes, access to energy for all is essential.

Sustainable energy is opportunity – it transforms lives, economies and the planet.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is leading a Sustainable Energy for All initiative to ensure universal access to modern energy services, improve efficiency and increase use of renewable sources.

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

The international community has made significant strides towards lifting people out of poverty. The most vulnerable nations – the least developed countries, the landlocked developing countries and the small island developing states – continue to make inroads into poverty reduction. However, inequality still persists and large disparities remain in access to health and education services and other assets.

Additionally, while income inequality between countries may have been reduced, inequality within countries has risen. There is growing consensus that economic growth is not sufficient to reduce poverty if it is not inclusive and if it does not involve the three dimensions of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental.

To reduce inequality, policies should be universal in principle paying attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalized populations.

11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

11. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Cities are hubs for ideas, commerce, culture, science, productivity, social development and much more. At their best, cities have enabled people to advance socially and economically.

However, many challenges exist to maintaining cities in a way that continues to create jobs and prosperity while not straining land and resources. Common urban challenges include congestion, lack of funds to provide basic services, a shortage of adequate housing and declining infrastructure.

The challenges cities face can be overcome in ways that allow them to continue to thrive and grow, while improving resource use and reducing pollution and poverty. The future we want includes cities of opportunities for all, with access to basic services, energy, housing, transportation and more.

16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies
16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

16. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies

Goal 16 of the Sustainable Development Goals is dedicated to the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, the provision of access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable institutions at all levels.